Consumer Tips

 

Consumer Tips…What you should know
before
you buy an Oriental Rug.

FACT…An educated buyer is a satisfied buyer.  If you have questions that are not covered
here or in
the links below, please feel free to ask by sending an email & please include your
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In today’s market there are many types of handmade rugs including kilims, sumacs, tapestries, and more.  However the rugs most often chosen for a luxurious look and long term use are
hand-woven knotted pile carpets produced in Iran, India, Pakistan, China, Afghanistan, Turkey, Russia, Rumania, Armenia and Nepal.  A pile rug, which may take months or
even years to complete, differs from the other hand-made floor covering in that the knots are individually inserted into the foundation and then cut one at a time.

The structure of the carpet, consisting of the knotted pile, warp and weft threads, fringe and selvedges – all should be closely examined.

The quality of an oriental rug not only depends on knot count and materials used, but on many other factors such as complexity of design, number of colors, and dying techniques.

The knot count may vary from 50 to 1000 knots per square inch.  A higher count usually indicates a more valuable rug, but not always.  The degree of fineness of the rug can be determined by looking at the back.

If you’re seriously considering purchasing an oriental, you may want to visit the glossary to become more familiar to the industry and care of an authentic oriental rug.


BACK OF RUG  DISPLAYING A
LOW KNOT COUNT


Nothing else pulls an interior space together more easily and expertly than an oriental rug. You can use it as background or it can be the focus of attention.

Oriental Rug Buyer’s Guide * Oriental Rug Cleaning Guide

Click here for an article by Myrna Bloom and Richard Marcus, “The Decorative Rug”